Are there different quality levels?

There are several basic quality levels of nonstick coatings on the market today, ranging from the least expensive (with the lowest performance) to the most expensive (with the highest performance and longest life), all based on the components used and the number of layers:

OPP/Promotional: One-coat nonsticks are used on inexpensive, opening-price-point housewares because they add only a little to the cost of the finished product. They perform adequately, but don't last as long.
Moderate/OPP: Two-coat nonsticks represent most of the lower to moderate housewares. They have good adhesion to the item, because the first, or primer, coat is formulated for adhesion. They also offer better release (the "nonstick" feature), because the second, or topcoat, usually has a higher percentage of PTFE.
Moderate/Upper Moderate: Three-coat nonsticks are generally used on upper-moderate housewares, and, due to the formulating of each coat to provide specific benefits, take the advantages of a two-coat nonstick and extend them.
Upper Moderate/Gourmet: Two- and Three-coat nonsticks that are internally reinforced use microscopic, hard reinforcing elements mixed into the coating to increase the wear and abrasion resistance, and are used on better housewares goods, mostly upper-moderate to gourmet-level products.
Other: Nonstick coatings that are applied over an externally reinforced system employ a step in which a reinforcing agent (such as stainless steel) is first sprayed onto the surface of the cookware, forming a series of tiny "peaks" and "valleys" into and over which the nonstick coating is applied. The peaks lock the nonstick into place, protecting it from wear and abrasion. For example, if a metal spatula is used on the surface, it will come in contact primarily with the peaks, leaving the nonstick in the valleys virtually untouched. Used mostly on gourmet-level, stainless-steel housewares products.

Ceramic coatings are relatively new to our industry, introduced in 2009. They have made a place for themselves in the market, due to unique attributes such as the ability to withstand high temperatures, scratch resistance and stain resistance. They can be made in very light colors - even white. Their downside is that they use a silicone fluid as the release agent, which is suspended in the coating, not a part of it. Due to this, the release life of these coatings is short, and with current technology, cannot reach the standards of traditional coatings. Proper application of these coatings is more difficult than traditional coatings, as is proper storage. Note: Whitford offers an application guide for its ceramic coatings.
 
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Are there different quality levels?

There are several basic quality levels of nonstick coatings on the market today, ranging from the least expensive (with the lowest performance) to the most expensive (with the highest performance and longest life), all based on the components used and the number of layers:

OPP/Promotional:  One-coat nonsticks are used on inexpensive, opening-price-point housewares because they add only a little to the cost of the finished product. They perform adequately, but don't last as long.

Moderate/OPP:  Two-coat nonsticks represent most of the lower to moderate housewares. They have good adhesion to the item, because the first, or primer, coat is formulated for adhesion. They also offer better release (the "nonstick" feature), because the second, or topcoat, usually has a higher percentage of PTFE.

Moderate/Upper Moderate:  Three-coat nonsticks are generally used on upper-moderate housewares, and, due to the formulating of each coat to provide specific benefits, take the advantages of a two-coat nonstick and extend them.

Upper Moderate/Gourmet:  Two- and Three-coat nonsticks that are internally reinforced use microscopic, hard reinforcing elements mixed into the coating to increase the wear and abrasion resistance, and are used on better housewares goods, mostly upper-moderate to gourmet-level products.

Other:

Nonstick coatings that are applied over an externally reinforced system employ a step in which a reinforcing agent (such as stainless steel) is first sprayed onto the surface of the cookware, forming a series of tiny "peaks" and "valleys" into and over which the nonstick coating is applied. The peaks lock the nonstick into place, protecting it from wear and abrasion. For example, if a metal spatula is used on the surface, it will come in contact primarily with the peaks, leaving the nonstick in the valleys virtually untouched. Used mostly on gourmet-level, stainless-steel housewares products.  

Ceramic coatings are relatively new to our industry, introduced in 2009. They have made a place for themselves in the market, due to unique attributes such as the ability to withstand high temperatures, scratch resistance and stain resistance. They can be made in very light colors – even white.  Their downside is that they use a silicone fluid as the release agent, which is suspended in the coating, not a part of it.  Due to this, the release life of these coatings is short, and with current technology, cannot reach the standards of traditional coatings.  Proper application of these coatings is more difficult than traditional coatings, as is proper storage. 

Note: Whitford offers an application guide for its ceramic coatings.


 
 
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