Properties of Copper

Copper, alone or in an alloyed form, has been used in cooking utensils almost since the dawn of history. Copper's uniform heat conductivity makes it a good material for top-of-range cooking because the heat is rapidly distributed evenly. This property also enables copper serving utensils to keep foods warm and palatable.

Copper cooking surfaces are usually lined with tin, stainless steel or coated with a nonstick finish because foods left directly in contact with uncoated copper may become discolored. The discoloration tends to detract from the food's eye appeal. Additionally, raw copper pans should never be used to cook acidic foods since copper salts which are poisonous can be produced.

An electrolytic process that deposits copper on the bottom of a stainless steel utensil utilizes copper's superior heat distribution. Another manufacturing process bonds or laminates copper to stainless steel and other metals. A core of solid copper sandwiched between two layers of stainless steel is another way copper is used to distribute heat uniformly.

Use and Care

Copper can be easily polished with various commercial copper cleaners. A mixture of flour, salt, lemon juice and ammonia or a mixture of vinegar and flour are two other methods of keeping copper utensils shiny. After cleaning, wash in sudsy water, and rinse before polishing with a soft, clean cloth.

Tin linings may wear off with frequent use; the utensil can be retinned.
 
PKN
Coating Curriculum Product knowledge Miscellaneous Information
 
 
 
 
 
Substrate Options

Properties of Copper

Copper, alone or in an alloyed form, has been used in cooking utensils almost since the dawn of history. Copper's uniform heat conductivity makes it a good material for top-of-range cooking because the heat is rapidly distributed evenly. This property also enables copper serving utensils to keep foods warm and palatable.

Properties of CopperCopper cooking surfaces are usually lined with tin, stainless steel or coated with a nonstick finish because foods left directly in contact with uncoated copper may become discolored. The discoloration tends to detract from the food's eye appeal. Additionally, raw copper pans should never be used to cook acidic foods since copper salts which are poisonous can be produced.

An electrolytic process that deposits copper on the bottom of a stainless steel utensil utilizes copper's superior heat distribution. Another manufacturing process bonds or laminates copper to stainless steel and other metals. A core of solid copper sandwiched between two layers of stainless steel is another way copper is used to distribute heat uniformly.

Use and Care

Copper can be easily polished with various commercial copper cleaners. A mixture of flour, salt, lemon juice and ammonia or a mixture of vinegar and flour are two other methods of keeping copper utensils shiny. After cleaning, wash in sudsy water, and rinse before polishing with a soft, clean cloth.

Tin linings may wear off with frequent use; the utensil can be retinned.

 

 

 
 
Sponsored By Whitford