MYTH #4: If a nonstick coating has a rough surface, it won't work right.

A few nonsticks (some of the best and most expensive nonsticks) are reinforced externally. The process involves spraying a layer of hot, molten metal, usually stainless steel, onto the surface of the pan, which forms a series of "peaks" and "valleys" as the metal cools. The nonstick coatings, usually three coats, are then applied onto this cooled metal surface, where the layers sink down into the "valleys" and cover the "peaks".

Once cured, the nonstick coating is now locked into place by the stainless-steel matrix, significantly increasing adhesion to the pan and between each layer.

Now, if a knife or fork is jabbed into the coating, the most damage it can do is scrape a bit off the tiny "peaks", which prevent any damage occurring to the nonstick in the "valleys".

While these "peaks" increase the resistance to scratching and wear, they also can create what appears to be a rough surface. This roughness in no way affects the release (or nonstick) properties of the coating.
 
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Common Myths about Nonstick Coatings

MYTH #4: If a nonstick coating has a rough surface, it won't work right.

A few nonsticks (some of the best and most expensive nonsticks) are reinforced externally. The process involves spraying a layer of hot, molten metal, usually stainless steel, onto the surface of the pan, which forms a series of "peaks" and "valleys" as the metal cools. The nonstick coatings, usually three coats, are then applied onto this cooled metal surface, where the layers sink down into the "valleys" and cover the "peaks".

Once cured, the nonstick coating is now locked into place by the stainless-steel matrix, significantly increasing adhesion to the pan and between each layer.

Now, if a knife or fork is jabbed into the coating, the most damage it can do is scrape a bit off the tiny "peaks", which prevent any damage occurring to the nonstick in the "valleys".

While these "peaks" increase the resistance to scratching and wear, they also can create what appears to be a rough surface. This roughness in no way affects the release (or nonstick) properties of the coating.

 

 

 
 
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