Design Aspects

Handles absorb heat. Heat transfer can be reduced by insulating the handle from the wall of the pan, making the handle of nonconductive plastic, or producing a handle long enough and/or shaped in such a way to dissipate the absorbed heat. Some producers of cookware use the term "cool" or some variation of that terminology, since they have designed the handle to dissipate the heat absorbed during use of the cookware. However, no handle can be totally cool to the touch and still remain connected to the pan. It's difficult to know how hot the pan may be under intentional use, so the CMA recommends consumers should always use a mitt, pad or other protective device when handling a hot pan.

A too-long handle also can make a pan "handle heavy" and therefore unstable with a tendency to tip. This problem is most often seen in small, 1- 1/2 quart saucepan where the maker has used a universal handle more properly sized for a larger pan.

CMA Engineering Standards also call for the handle to have clearance on its underside of 1- 3/16 inches at a point half way along the length of the handle. This is to give room for the user's hand to clear any hot surfaces below the handle the pan is being used.
 
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Handles and Fittings

Design Aspects

CMA Buyers Guide to HandlesHandles absorb heat. Heat transfer can be reduced by insulating the handle from the wall of the pan, making the handle of nonconductive plastic, or producing a handle long enough and/or shaped in such a way to dissipate the absorbed heat. Some producers of cookware use the term "cool" or some variation of that terminology, since they have designed the handle to dissipate the heat absorbed during use of the cookware. However, no handle can be totally cool to the touch and still remain connected to the pan. It's difficult to know how hot the pan may be under intentional use, so the CMA recommends consumers should always use a mitt, pad or other protective device when handling a hot pan.

A too-long handle also can make a pan "handle heavy" and therefore unstable with a tendency to tip. This problem is most often seen in small, 1- 1/2 quart saucepan where the maker has used a universal handle more properly sized for a larger pan.

CMA Engineering Standards also call for the handle to have clearance on its underside of 1- 3/16 inches at a point half way along the length of the handle. This is to give room for the user's hand to clear any hot surfaces below the handle the pan is being used.


 
 
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