Design Aspects

Handles can be riveted through the wall of the pan, attached with a screw to a handle fixing device (often integrated with a flame guard for plastic handles, to shield the plastic from direct heat from gas burners), or in some cases be designed to grip the wall of the pan but release for storage or for use of the pan inside an oven. A handle fixing device that mates with a plastic handle is usually secured to the wall of the pan using high current spot welding. Simple one-piece handles are sometimes spot welded directly to the pan wall. See the illustrations above and below.

The CMA recommends a number of tests in its Engineering Standards to insure that the handle and its fixing method or attachment meets stringent design criteria. There are tests performed on both hot and room temperature handles and pans that help the designer determine the optimum handle for a pan. The CMA believes that good design should allow 15,000 cycles of raising and lowering pan to a level surface without loosening of the handle or its fixing system when tested with a weight 1.5 times the pan's water capacity. Additionally for stick handles, the association recommends a torque test of 40 inch pounds be applied to the handle to check for undesirable deflection by twisting.

The manufacturing cost of a handle includes the cost of the handle, its fixturing system and the labor and time necessary to attach the handle. Through riveting requires several operations: A punch operation to place holes in the wall of the pan, then a riveting operation that places and then heads the rivets to secure the handle to the pan. With plastic handles, the fixturing system is usually welded to the sidewall of the pan and then the handle is secured with a screw that passes through the handle and into the fixture. Some form metal stick handles can be simply spot welded to the body of the pan, depending on the pan's material and gauge.
 
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Handles and Fittings

Design Aspects

Riveted and welded handle attachment.Handles can be riveted through the wall of the pan, attached with a screw to a handle fixing device (often integrated with a flame guard for plastic handles, to shield the plastic from direct heat from gas burners), or in some cases be designed to grip the wall of the pan but release for storage or for use of the pan inside an oven. A handle fixing device that mates with a plastic handle is usually secured to the wall of the pan using high current spot welding. Simple one-piece handles are sometimes spot welded directly to the pan wall. See the illustrations above and below.

The CMA recommends a number of tests in its Engineering Standards to insure that the handle and its fixing method or attachment meets stringent design criteria. There are tests performed on both hot and room temperature handles and pans that help the designer determine the optimum handle for a pan. The CMA believes that good design should allow 15,000 cycles of raising and lowering pan to a level surface without loosening of the handle or its fixing system when tested with a weight 1.5 times the pan's water capacity. Additionally for stick handles, the association recommends a torque test of 40 inch pounds be applied to the handle to check for undesirable deflection by twisting.

The manufacturing cost of a handle includes the cost of the handle, its fixturing system and the labor and time necessary to attach the handle. Through riveting requires several operations: A punch operation to place holes in the wall of the pan, then a riveting operation that places and then heads the rivets to secure the handle to the pan. With plastic handles, the fixturing system is usually welded to the sidewall of the pan and then the handle is secured with a screw that passes through the handle and into the fixture. Some form metal stick handles can be simply spot welded to the body of the pan, depending on the pan's material and gauge.


 

 
 
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