What are fluoropolymers used for?

Fluoropolymers are thermoplastics, which simply means that at some point energy (in most cases, heat, which is why the prefix "thermo") is used to achieve the final form.

Typical uses for fluoropolymers include wire insulation for computer networks, semi-conductor manufacturing equipment, and automotive fuel hoses. About 85 percent of fluoropolymers are used in industrial applications like these. The other 15 percent are used in consumer products such as nonstick cookware, bakeware, small electrics and weather- and chemical-protective fabrics.

Because of their unique qualities (which include great strength, versatility, durability and heat resistance), fluoropolymers improve the performance and safety of such things as aircraft and automobiles, reduce risk of fire in high-rise buildings, and reduce air, water, industrial and automotive pollution.

For nonstick coatings, because of their low surface energy, foodstuffs can't "wet" the surface of the nonstick coating. An everyday example of this is wax on a car's exterior paint. When unwaxed, a drop of water will wet the painted surface, spread out and cling. Once waxed, the water drop can no longer wet the paint and will form a bead instead. Because of the low surface energy the wax imparts, the water bead can now easily roll off the waxed paint.

PTFE can easily withstand the temperatures associated with everyday cooking (remember, it has already been cured onto the pan at temperatures over 800F/425C!). And it is inert to virtually all chemicals, including the harshest dishwasher detergents. So it is the fluoropolymer in nonstick coatings that ultimately provides easy release and easy cleanup of foodstuffs, reducing the need for oils and butter - which means healthier cooking and saving time in the kitchen.
 
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What are fluoropolymers used for?

Fluoropolymers are thermoplastics, which simply means that at some point energy (in most cases, heat, which is why the prefix "thermo") is used to achieve the final form.

Typical uses for fluoropolymers include wire insulation for computer networks, semi-conductor manufacturing equipment, and automotive fuel hoses. About 85 percent of fluoropolymers are used in industrial applications like these. The other 15 percent are used in consumer products such as nonstick cookware, bakeware, small electrics and weather- and chemical-protective fabrics.

Because of their unique qualities (which include great strength, versatility, durability and heat resistance), fluoropolymers improve the performance and safety of such things as aircraft and automobiles, reduce risk of fire in high-rise buildings, and reduce air, water, industrial and automotive pollution.

For nonstick coatings, because of their low surface energy, foodstuffs can't "wet" the surface of the nonstick coating. An everyday example of this is wax on a car's exterior paint. When unwaxed, a drop of water will wet the painted surface, spread out and cling. Once waxed, the water drop can no longer wet the paint and will form a bead instead. Because of the low surface energy the wax imparts, the water bead can now easily roll off the waxed paint.

PTFE can easily withstand the temperatures associated with everyday cooking (remember, it has already been cured onto the pan at temperatures over 800F/425C!). And it is inert to virtually all chemicals, including the harshest dishwasher detergents. So it is the fluoropolymer in nonstick coatings that ultimately provides easy release and easy cleanup of foodstuffs, reducing the need for oils and butter - which means healthier cooking and saving time in the kitchen.


 

 
 
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