Cooking with Radiant Heat

The transfer of heat by electromagnetic waves. Radiant Heat does not require direct contact with a heat source, liquids or air. Like sound and light, radiant heat is emitted in waves. Radiant Heat is the reason you can feel hot even on a cool day when you are in direct sunlight.

The heat source in a broiler or an oven produces heat waves. These heat waves are radiated to the food mass thus penetrating and heating. In a coventional oven, over half of the heat is radiant energy (the rest is by convection currents with some added conduction). The transfer of radiant heat relies on the ability of a utensil to absorb radiant heat energy. Dark or blackened surfaces soak up radiant heat, while shiny, bright surfaces reflect heat. Many baking recipes reduce cooking time for dark bakeware.
 
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Coating Curriculum Product knowledge Miscellaneous Information
 
 
 
 
 
Heat Sources

Cooking with Radiant Heat

The transfer of heat by electromagnetic waves. Radiant Heat does not require direct contact with a heat source, liquids or air. Like sound and light, radiant heat is emitted in waves. Radiant Heat is the reason you can feel hot even on a cool day when you are in direct sunlight.

The heat source in a broiler or an oven produces heat waves. These heat waves are radiated to the food mass thus penetrating and heating. In a coventional oven, over half of the heat is radiant energy (the rest is by convection currents with some added conduction). The transfer of radiant heat relies on the ability of a utensil to absorb radiant heat energy. Dark or blackened surfaces soak up radiant heat, while shiny, bright surfaces reflect heat. Many baking recipes reduce cooking time for dark bakeware.

Radiant Heat Source in Oven When Broiling

 

 
 
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