Cooking by Induction

Heat is induced into the cookware by an electromagnetic field effect. An electromagnetic coil beneath the ceramic cooking surface creates a magnetic field. This magnetic field passes through the cooking surface to ferrous (iron or steel) cookware, and by its oscillation, induces heat within the pan and cooks the contents. Cookware must have magnetic properties to work on induction cook tops. Non-magnetic metal such as aluminum cannot be used on induction ranges. The heat generated is in the cooking utensil itself as the cook top remains relatively cool since it is non-conductive. While popular in Europe, induction cook tops still account for only a tiny fraction of cooktops sold in the U.S. and Canada.

The induction unit is extremely energy efficient since almost no heat or energy is wasted beyond the edge of the pan and because heating stops when the pan is removed.
 
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Heat Sources

Cooking by Induction

Heat is induced into the cookware by an electromagnetic field effect. An electromagnetic coil beneath the ceramic cooking surface creates a magnetic field. This magnetic field passes through the cooking surface to ferrous (iron or steel) cookware, and by its oscillation, induces heat within the pan and cooks the contents. Cookware must have magnetic properties to work on induction cook tops. Non-magnetic metal such as aluminum cannot be used on induction ranges. The heat generated is in the cooking utensil itself as the cook top remains relatively cool since it is non-conductive. While popular in Europe, induction cook tops still account for only a tiny fraction of cooktops sold in the U.S. and Canada.

The induction unit is extremely energy efficient since almost no heat or energy is wasted beyond the edge of the pan and because heating stops when the pan is removed.

Cooking by Induction

 

 
 
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