Cooking by Convection

Heat transfer by convection requires the movement of air or liquids called convection currents. In the cooking process where liquids are involved, convection often modifies or controls the rate of heat conduction. Heat transfer is never by convection alone. In a saucepan, the fluid first begins to heat by conduction. The heated portion rises by convection and is replaced by the cooked portions. As the hot and cool food particles intermingle, the food mass uniformly warms.

Similar to surface cooking, when oven baking, air near the heat source rises and circulates, only to be replaced by the cooler air. The heated air, moving in convection currents, penetrates the food, assisting in the cooking process. Think of the warmth of bath water warming you as you lie in it; or the warm current of air emitted by a central heating system to understand convection.
 
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Cooking by Convection

Heat transfer by convection requires the movement of air or liquids called convection currents. In the cooking process where liquids are involved, convection often modifies or controls the rate of heat conduction. Heat transfer is never by convection alone. In a saucepan, the fluid first begins to heat by conduction. The heated portion rises by convection and is replaced by the cooked portions. As the hot and cool food particles intermingle, the food mass uniformly warms.

Similar to surface cooking, when oven baking, air near the heat source rises and circulates, only to be replaced by the cooler air. The heated air, moving in convection currents, penetrates the food, assisting in the cooking process. Think of the warmth of bath water warming you as you lie in it; or the warm current of air emitted by a central heating system to understand convection.

Cooking by Convection

 

 
 
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