Roller

How it works: metal disks are passed between two elastomeric rollers, one of which is kept wet with coating which is rolled onto the disk, then carried away on a belt to be cured. After the curing process, the disks are shaped into the desired forms.

Uses

Promotional, opening-price-point levels. Cookware: Interiors and exteriors. Bakeware. Small Electronics. Advantages

Speed: Capable of coating 3.000 to 4,000 pieces per hour. Transfer efficiency: Virtually all of the coating material is used on the disk, which means little waste. Uniform coating application. Disadvantages

Aesthetics: The pressure from the rollers can create small striations or ridges that leave the surface in a roughened form (such as tracks left by a paint roller). The tracks are visible and make a smooth glossy finish impossible to achieve. Performance: The final coating is thin, and the ridges reduce coating life since kitchen instruments tend to wear them off quickly when scraped across the coated surface of the pan. High equipment cost: Since the mechanics of roller coating "squeeze" the coating onto the surface, it is difficult to achieve proper film thickness in one or two coats. So, the process must be repeated up to five times to arrive at a reasonable coating thickness, which means more capital equipment than other processes.
 
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Application Methods

Roller - Application Method

Roller

How it works: metal disks are passed between two elastomeric rollers, one of which is kept wet with coating which is rolled onto the disk, then carried away on a belt to be cured. After the curing process, the disks are shaped into the desired forms.

Uses

  • Promotional, opening-price-point levels.
  • Cookware: Interiors and exteriors.
  • Bakeware.
  • Small Electronics.

Advantages

  • Speed: Capable of coating 3.000 to 4,000 pieces per hour.
  • Transfer efficiency: Virtually all of the coating material is used on the disk, which means little waste.
  • Uniform coating application.

Disadvantages

  • Aesthetics: The pressure from the rollers can create small striations or ridges that leave the surface in a roughened form (such as tracks left by a paint roller). The tracks are visible and make a smooth glossy finish impossible to achieve.
  • Performance: The final coating is thin, and the ridges reduce coating life since kitchen instruments tend to wear them off quickly when scraped across the coated surface of the pan.
  • High equipment cost: Since the mechanics of roller coating "squeeze" the coating onto the surface, it is difficult to achieve proper film thickness in one or two coats. So, the process must be repeated up to five times to arrive at a reasonable coating thickness, which means more capital equipment than other processes.

 

 
 
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