Why all the noise about PFOA?

PFOA has been found to be persistent in the environment and has been detected at low levels in blood-bank samples in several locations in the United States. It has also been found in the blood of wildlife, including polar bears in the Arctic. In 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimated PFOA levels in the general population to be approximately 5 parts per billion, the equivalent in time of 5 seconds in a span of 32 years. Several carefully controlled studies have been conducted to date, without any findings of any adverse health effects to humans.

In 2005, DuPont and Environ International investigated PFOA, publishing a risk assessment using a margin of exposure (MOE) approach, also referred to as a margin of safety. Under this methodology, higher MOE values represent lower levels of risk. The values in this report, ranging from 30,000 to greater than 9 billion (nonstick cookware), represent substantial protection of the general population.

In addition, no study has ever shown that the trace levels of PFOA, in the blood of Americans (and most people on the planet), has ever resulted in any illness. Extensive studies of workers exposed to much higher levels of PFOA in chemical plants have never found any association between the chemical and illness of any kind.
 
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PFOA

Why all the noise about PFOA?

PFOA has been found to be persistent in the environment and has been detected at low levels in blood-bank samples in several locations in the United States. It has also been found in the blood of wildlife, including polar bears in the Arctic. In 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimated PFOA levels in the general population to be approximately 5 parts per billion, the equivalent in time of 5 seconds in a span of 32 years. Since then, most of the environmental sources of PFOA have been eliminated and blood levels have fallen accordingly. No study has ever shown that these sorts of trace levels of PFOA in the blood of Americans (and most people on the planet) has ever resulted in any illness.

In 2005, DuPont and Environ International investigated PFOA, publishing a risk assessment using a margin of exposure (MOE) approach, also referred to as a margin of safety. Under this methodology, higher MOE values represent lower levels of risk. The values in this report, ranging from 30,000 to greater than 9 billion (nonstick cookware), represent substantial protection of the general population.


 

 
 
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