What is PFOA?

PFOA is an important chemical, crucial to the manufacture of materials used to make products that span the entire U.S. economy, and, in this case, fluoropolymers.

All nonstick-coating manufacturers use water-based fluoropolymer (nonstick) dispersions that contain some level of PFOA - without exception today. PFOA, also known as APFO and C-8, stands for "perfluorooctanoic acid". It is a surfactant and is an essential polymerization aid used in very small quantities to help make fluoropolymer dispersions.

For the fluoropolymer (which in most cases is PTFE) to be added as an ingredient in a nonstick coating formulation, small PTFE particles are "dispersed" in water. And to prevent them from massing together, an agent is used (the surfactant), which traditionally has been PFOA. Today, there is a very small amount of PFOA used in fewer and fewer of these dispersions.
 
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PFOA

What is PFOA?

PFOA, also known as APFO and C-8, stands for "perfluorooctanoic acid". It is a surfactant (e.g., a wetting agent/soap/detergent) and has been used in the past as an essential polymerization aid to make fluoropolymer dispersions.

During the manufacturing process, small PTFE particles must be "dispersed" in water. To prevent them from massing together, an agent is used (the surfactant), which traditionally has been PFOA. Today, alternative methods are being used that do not require PFOA.

 

 
 
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